Quantcast Figure 1-18.-Hazardous noise warning decal.
 

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IDENTIFYING AND LABELING OF NOISE
commercially prepared sunburn lotions and
ointments.
AREAS AND EQUIPMENT
For further information on the treatment of burns,
Hazardous noise areas and equipment must be so
refer to Standard First Aid Training Course,
designated and appropriately labeled. Areas and
NAVEDTRA 10081-D.
equipment that produce continuous and intermittent
sound levels greater than 84 dB(A) or impact or
HEARING CONSERVATION AND
impulse levels of 140 dB peak are considered
NOISE ABATEMENT
hazardous.
An industrial hygienist with a noise level meter
Historically, hearing loss has been recognized as
will identify the noise hazardous areas. Noise
an occupational hazard related to certain trades, such
hazardous areas will be labeled using a hazardous
as blacksmithing and boilermaking. Modern
noise warning decal, NAVMED 6260/2 (fig. 1-18).
technology has extended the risk to many other
This decal will be posted at all accesses. Hazardous
activities: using presses, forging hammers, grinders,
noise labels, NAVMED 6260/2A, are the approved
saws, internal combustion engines, or similar
labels for marking portable and installed equipment.
high-speed, high-energy processes. Exposure to
high-intensity noise occurs as a result of either impact
All personnel that are required to work in
noise, such as gunfire or rocket fire, or from
designated noise hazardous areas or with equipment
continuous noise, such as jet or propeller aircraft,
that produces sound levels greater than 84 dB(A) or
marine engines, and machinery.
140 dB sound/pressure levels are entered in the
Hearing loss has been and continues to be a source
hearing conservation program.
of concern within the Navy, both ashore and afloat.
You will find further information on hearing
Hearing loss attributed to such occupational exposure
conservation in OPNAVINST 5100.23C, Navy
to hazardous noise, the high cost of related
Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) Program
compensation claims, and the resulting drop in
Manual  and  OPNAVINST  5100.19B,  Navy
productivity and efficiency have highlighted a
Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) Program
significant problem that requires considerable
Manual for Forces Afloat.
attention. The goal of the Navy Hearing Conservation
Program is to prevent occupational noise-related
hearing loss among Navy personnel. The program
includes the following elements:
Work environments will be surveyed to identify
potentially hazardous noise levels and person-
nel at risk.
Environments that contain, or equipment that
produces, potentially hazardous noise should
be modified to reduce the noise to acceptable
levels whenever technologically and economi-
cally feasible. When this is not feasible, admin-
istrative control and/or hearing protection
devices should be used.
Periodic hearing testing must be conducted to
monitor the effectiveness of the program.
Navy personnel must be educated on the Hear-
ing Conservation Program to ensure the overall
Figure 1-18.-Hazardous noise warning decal.
success of the program.

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